Alhambra Tickets

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Opening hours

Monday: 08:30 – 20:00 and 22:00 – 23:30

Tuesday: 08:30 – 20:00 and 22:00 – 23:30

Wednesday: 08:30 – 20:00 and 22:00 – 23:30

Thursday: 08:30 – 20:00 and 22:00 – 23:30

Friday: 08:30 – 20:00 and 22:00 – 23:30

Saturday: 08:30 – 20:00 and 22:00 – 23:30

Sunday: 08:30 – 20:00 and 22:00 – 23:30

The above opening hours extend from 1st April to 14th October. Between October 15th and March 31st, opening hours fall between 08:30 and 18:00, and 20:00 and 21:30. The Alhambra is open throughout the year except 25th December and 1st January.

How to get there

Calle Real de la Alhambra, s/n, 18009 Granada, Spain

It’s easy to reach the Alhambra from Granada. It’s just a 1km walk from Plaza Nueva, although there is a steep incline. Simply walk up to the woods, follow the path and then turn onto Cuesta de Gomérez Street. Alternatively, drive southward from the Granada ring road or take the number 30 or 31 bus from the Plaza de Isabel la Católica, which is just 100 metres from the Plaza Nueva.

FAQ

Are there disabled facilities?
Wheelchairs are available on request and around 50% of the complex is accessible by wheelchair. Disabled visitors are entitled to a concessionary rate to reflect this. Entranceways to the Nasrid Palaces and the Generalife are wheelchair accessible and there are disabled access toilets by the entrance pavilion and next to the Puerta del Vino.
Is there a car park on site?
There is a public car park situated next to the ticket office. There is an hourly fee, but the car park is guarded at all times.
Are the concessionary rates?
Children under 12 go free and pensioners from the European Union and anyone over 65 is entitled to a concessionary rate. Students need to pay the full price.
Is there a cashpoint on site?
There are two cashpoints: one next to the Entrance Pavilion and the other next to the Wine Gate.
Can we take a guided tour?
There is an official, three-hour guided tour available in Spanish, English and French. A maximum of 30 visitors will be in each group and there is a headphone system so you’ll be able to keep up with the information being given.
Is it possible to book a private party at the Alhambra?
Yes. Part of the Nazari Palaces are available for private hire outside normal visiting hours. This can be arranged with or without a private guide.
Is it possible to visit the Alhambra at night?
Yes, the Alhambra is open every night and it is also possible to book a guide at night.

About the Alhambra

Carlos V Palace
Construction on the Carlos V Palace began in 1527 but was only completed in 1957. The square palace features an imposing circular courtyard ringed by 32 columns, and inside the palace you’ll find two museums: the Alhambra Museum with its vast collection of Islamic artefacts and the Museum of Fine Arts, which displays artworks from between the 15th and 20th centuries.
Carlos V Palace

Carlos V Palace

The Medina
Once home to public baths, community ovens and a selection of workshops, the Medina was destroyed during the War of Independence. These days, visitors can view the foundations, complete with parapet walls and battlements of the rampart.
The Medina

The Medina

Rauda
The royal cemetery has recently been restored with respect to its original structure.
Rauda

Rauda. Amra Pasic / Shutterstock.com

Nazrid Palaces
There are three important areas inside the Nazrid Palaces. Enter through the 14th century Mexuar, where the emir once sat with his council of ministers. The intricately carved wooden walls, pillars and ceilings tell a story of the opulence once enjoyed here. The Camares Palace was once the king’s official residence while the Palace of the Lions housed the harems. Here you’ll find the complex, geometrically designed courtyard with its pretty columns and ornamental pavilions.
Nazrid Palaces
Alcazaba
The original 13th century citadel now lies in ruins but it’s still possible to climb the watchtower and enjoy panoramic views of Granada.
Alcazaba

Alcazaba

Generalife
Dating back to the 14th century, the Generalife has been altered many times throughout history. Once the Sultan’s summer estates, the Gereralife is now a beautiful maze of pretty pathways, fountains and pools, tumbling flowers and towering trees. A 700-year-old cypress tree reminds us what things may once have looked like.
Generalife

Generalife

Nearby

Saint Nicolas Church
Visit this church for fantastic view of the Alhambra at sunset. Offering spectacular views of the complex with the imposing Sierra Nevada behind, the church can be reached from the Alhambra through the maze of streets in between.
Saint Nicolas Church

Saint Nicolas Church

Basilica of Saint John of God
Glittering with golden adornments and baroque embellishment, the basilica of Saint John of God is situated close enough to the Alhambra in Granada for it to be well worth visiting. Built in the 1700s, the basilica’s centrepiece is the remains of St John of God which lie in a recess behind the alter, surrounded by an endless sea of gold.
Basilica of Saint John of God

Basilica of Saint John of God

The Royal Chapel
The final resting place of Catholic monarchs Isabel I of Castile and Fernando II of Aragon is a highly decorative Gothic mausoleum which was completed in 1517. Within the sacristy is a small museum which contains Isabel’s sceptre, crown, a collection of art and Fernando’s sword.
Monastery of Saint Jerónimo
This beautiful Catholic building boasts an opulent interior with brightly painted sculptures and Gothic and Renaissance architecture.
Monastery of Saint Jerónimo

Monastery of Saint Jerónimo